14th April, 2014

(via AUSTIN KLEON)

14th April, 2014

(via Jennifer Lynn Barnes)

14th April, 2014


The sketch is inscribed in pencil “Missy dear - any of these can be combined - Jughead -” and “This one” with additional style notations and rough pencil sketching. Missy was the nickname for Barbara Stanwyck, and Jughead was the nickname for Edith Head.

The sketch is inscribed in pencil “Missy dear - any of these can be combined - Jughead -” and “This one” with additional style notations and rough pencil sketching. Missy was the nickname for Barbara Stanwyck, and Jughead was the nickname for Edith Head.

(Source: fashionsfromhistory)

(via Fuck Yeah Barbara Stanwyck)

13th April, 2014

“I am tired of token women being strong in a man’s world by taking on male attributes: strutting around in black leather, spike heels and wraparound shades, killing people; or riding a horse, swearing a lot, carrying a big sword, and killing people; or piloting a ship through hyperspace, drinking whatever pours, slapping boys on the back, and killing people. I am equally tired of women-only worlds where all the characters are wise, kind, beautiful, stern seven-foot-tall vegetarian amazons who could never dream of killing anyone. I am tired of reading about aliens who are really women, or women who are really aliens.

Women are not aliens. Take away men, and we do not automatically lose our fire and intelligence and sex drive; we do not form hierarchical, static, insectlike societies that are dreadfully inefficient. We do not turn into a homogenous Thought Police culture where meat-eating is banned and men are burned in effigy every full moon. Women are not inherently passive or dominant, maternal, or vicious. We are all different. We are people.

A women-only world, it seems to me, would shine with the entire spectrum of human behavior: there would be capitalists and collectivists, hermits and clan members, sailors and cooks, idealists and tyrants; they would be generous and mean, smart and stupid, strong and weak; they would approach life bravely, fearfully and thoughtlessly. Some might still engage in fights, wars, and territorial squabbles; individuals and cultures would still display insanity and greed and indifference. And they would change and grow, just like anyone else. Because women are anyone else. We are more than half of humanity. We are not imitation people, or chameleons taking on protective male coloration, longing for the day when men go away and we can return to being our true, insectlike, static, vacuous selves. We are here, now. We are just like you.”

Nicola Griffith, talking about writing Ammonite (via limousine-eyelash)

Twenty years ago, as she pointed out on Twitter, and still something we need to hear.

(via ktempest)

Just one of many reasons why Nicola is one of my favorite writers in the world. Read her books; they are amazing.

(Source: dont-deconstruct)

(via Claudia Gray's Photo Blog)

12th April, 2014

If you present yourself in certain feminized ways — whatever your sex or gender — there are joys and annoying consequences. For me, the joys include playing with my appearance, feeling free to abandon codes of behavior that connote dignity in academia and business, and various sensual pleasures. The annoying consequences include being thought silly, weak and incompetent.

They are pretty damn annoying.

- E. Lockhart

E. Lockhart on embracing the young adult inside her - latimes.com

Great essay.